• A van struck four people at the Netherlands’ largest music festival in the early hours of Monday, killing one of them and injuring the others before driving off, police said. Officers said it was not clear whether the van driver, who later turned himself in to the police, had hit the group at the Pinkpop event intentionally or by accident.
  • Philippine troops have clashed with remnants of a pro-ISIS terrorist group that held a southern city for five months last year, the army said on Monday. Colonel Romeo Brawner, the deputy commander of Joint Task Force Marawi, said security forces conducted air and ground assaults in the province of Lanao del Sur on Sunday in a bid to flush out Maute rebels and the group’s new leader.
  • Uzbekistan has detained a returnee with United States citizenship, accusing him of being a former Islamist terrorists, the Central Asian nation’s state news agency, UzA, reported on Monday. Uzbek-born Zokir Aliyev, 46, U.S. citizen since 2014, was detained on June 16 in the southern Qashqadaryo province, UzA said, citing the State Security Service.
  • Eight Kenyan police officials were killed when their vehicle hit an improvised explosive device planted by al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, police said. The terrorists took eight weapons – six AK47 assault rifles and two G3 battle rifles – and 510 rounds of ammunition from the eight officers killed on Sunday in the east of the country, a police report said.
  • Blasts have killed at least 20 people in northeast Nigeria on Sunday, police said, while residents said the toll was even higher in the largest attack for weeks in a region blighted by the Islamist terrorist group Boko Haram. Security in Nigeria has become a major challenge for President Muhammadu Buhari, a former military ruler whose 2015 election win was largely due to his vow to crush Boko Haram.
  • Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s office on Sunday extended a unilateral ceasefire with Taliban terrorists, due to end on Wednesday June 20, by 10 days. “Afghan security forces can defend themselves against any attack,” Durani Waziri, spokeswoman for the presidential palace, said. 
  • A car bomb killed at least 26 people at a gathering of Taliban and Afghan armed forces in the eastern city of Nangarhar on Saturday, an official said, as soldiers and terrorists celebrated an unprecedented Eid ceasefire. ISIS claimed responsibility. The Taliban had already denied involvement.
  • The U.S. State Department warned Americans on Friday that terrorists may target World Cup venues in Russia, which is hosting the month-long soccer tournament, but it did not point to any specific threat. As with previous advisories, the State Department urged Americans to reconsider travel to Russia in general due to the threat of terrorism, and because of possible harassment and extortion from law enforcement and other officials.
  • A mother and daughter “filled with hate and toxic ideology” were jailed on Friday for planning terrorist attacks in London, including a likely knife rampage. Rizlaine Boular, 22, and her mother Mina Dich, 44, had earlier admitted preparing terrorist acts after having been tracked by police as they drove around carrying out reconnaissance of potential targets in central London in April last year
  • Forces from an alliance of Arab states seized two entrances to the airport in Yemen’s main port city on Friday, in an offensive against the Iran-aligned Houthi movement that the United Nations fears could trigger a famine imperiling millions of lives. The swift advance was an important early success for the Saudi- and United Arab Emirates-led alliance, which launched the operation in Hodeidah three days ago and says it can seize the city quickly enough to avoid interrupting aid to the millions facing starvation.
  • US-backed Syrian Defense Forces (SDF) reportedly killed the ISIS executioner Talip Akkurt, known by his nom de guerre Abu Talha al Turki, who burned two Turkish soldiers alive in Syria in 2016.
  • Attacks by armed groups in northern Mozambique, where huge gas reserves are being developed, have killed at least 39 people and displaced more than 1,000 since May, Human Rights Watch said on Tuesday. The group implicated is known locally as Al-Sunna wa Jama’a and Al-Shabab, although there are no known links to the Somali group of the same name or any other Islamist movement.
  • Dutch authorities have detained three men with suspected links to ISIS based on DNA evidence found on arms found at a French hideout. A fourth suspect linked to the case was already in a Dutch jail because of an unrelated incident.
  • The Taliban has rejected a request by the Afghan government to extend its short-lived ceasefire. President Ashraf Ghani declared a one-sided ceasefire on June 7, hoping that the Taliban would follow suit. Ghani’s move was widely supported by NATO and the US government, including the US military and State Department, as part of a gambit to start meaningful peace talks.
  • ISIS terrorists detonated an IED that killed four government soldiers and wounded five others in Somalia on June 15. ISIS-linked Amaq News Agency claimed the attack.
  • A source in Germany’s BfV domestic intelligence service said on Wednesday that Islamists could stage an attack in Germany at any time with the lethal toxin ricin. The BfV source said ISIS terrorists had experimented with ricin in the past and had also manufactured it. ISIS, the source added, had offered detailed instructions on how to produce ricin in a handbook.
  • Taliban terrorists killed 30 Afghan soldiers and captured a military base in the western province of Badghis on Wednesday, the provincial governor said, their first major attack since a ceasefire for the Eid al-Fitr holiday. The three-day Taliban ceasefire ended on Sunday.
  • Several dozen rockets and mortar bombs launched at Israel by Palestinians in Gaza, and Israeli air strikes on the enclave’s dominant Hamas terrorist group, raised the heat along the border on Wednesday. Despite the biggest flare-up in weeks in the area, no deaths were reported.
  • Saraya al Mokhtar, a Bahraini Shia militia linked to Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), released a message on Tuesday sending its condolences to the Iraqi IRGC proxy, the Hezbollah Brigades. The latter’s forces were recently hit by airstrikes near the Syrian town of Albu Kamal. This now makes two Bahraini Shia militia with more overt IRGC branding.
  • The US-led coalition announced on Tuesday that four members of ISIS’s oil and gas network were targeted and killed during “operations” on May 26. Abu Khattab al-Iraqi, the ringleader of this network, “managed revenue generation through the illicit sale of oil and gas,” according to Combined Joint Force Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve (CJTF-OIR). The “other three men killed, Abu Yusuf al-Hashimi, Abu Hajir Milhim, and Abu Hiba al-Maghrebi, facilitated these operations.”
  • On Thursday, Iraqi Police and members of the Iranian-backed Hezbollah Brigades clashed in the streets of Baghdad. At least three people were wounded in the shootout. The attacks began after Iraqi police officers on patrol pulled over a vehicle in eastern Baghdad.
  • Europeans who went off to fight on behalf of ISIS have not flooded back in large numbers since losing strongholds in Syria and Iraq, Europe’s police agency said on Wednesday, but they have inspired a growing number of home-grown attacks. There has been a spike in recent years in ISIS-inspired attacks by “lone wolves” using little more weaponry than a knife or car.
  • Four members of east Libyan security forces were killed in the city of Derna on Wednesday by a suicide bomber bearing a white flag as he drove towards a group of soldiers, a military spokesman said. The Libyan National Army is fighting to take Derna, the last city in eastern Libya outside its control, after launching a ground offensive against a coalition of local forces and Islamist terrorists last month.
  • Seven Islamist terrorists surrendered to Algerian authorities on Wednesday near the North African country’s border with Mali, the defense ministry said. Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and small bands of fighters allied to ISIS are still active in some remote areas.
  • An Indonesian court on Friday sentenced to death a cleric linked to ISIS, for masterminding from his jail cell a string of deadly terrorist attacks across the world’s largest Muslim-majority country. Aman Abdurrahman, 46, is considered the ideological leader of Jemaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD) - a loose grouping of ISIS sympathizers in Indonesia.
  • British police said on Friday they had arrested a man at London’s Charing Cross railway station who claimed he had a bomb. Britain is on currently on its second highest threat level of “severe”, meaning an attack by terrorists is considered highly likely.
  • Taliban terrorists killed at least 16 Afghan police and two civilians in western Badghis province after their three-day ceasefire for the Eid al-Fitr holiday ended at the weekend, officials said on Friday. The Taliban, fighting to reimpose strict Islamic law after their 2001 ouster, resumed their campaign on Thursday after rejecting President Ashraf Ghani’s request to extend their ceasefire beyond Sunday.
  • Three men from a rural community in Illinois were indicted on Thursday and charged for the 2017 bombing of a mosque outside Minneapolis, U.S. prosecutors said. Michael McWhorter, 29, Joe Morris, 23, and Michael B. Hari, 47, were accused of carrying out a pipe bomb attack on the Dar al-Farooq Islamic Center in Bloomington, Minnesota, on Aug. 5, 2017. The bomb damaged the building, but caused no injuries, according to a statement from the Minnesota U.S. Attorney’s Office.