• Tajik authorities say terrorism is a possible motive in the killing of four foreign cyclists who were attacked by at least one assailant with a gun and knife after being plowed down by a vehicle in southern Tajikistan. Interior Minister Ramazon Rahimzoda said in Dushanbe on July 30 that a governmental group has been formed to investigate the incident, in which two Americans, one Dutchman, and a Swiss citizen were killed.
  • A Plano West Senior High School student has been indicted for allegedly plotting a terrorist attack at Frisco's Stonebriar Mall. Matin Azizi-Yarand, 17, is charged with solicitation to commit capital murder of a peace officer and terroristic threat. The FBI says Matin exchanged messages about the plot with a person who turned out to be working for the bureau. In a May jailhouse interview with FOX 4, the teen denied planning the ISIS-inspired attack.
  • The man arrested for plotting a terrorist attack in downtown Cleveland on the Fourth of July will undergo a psych evaluation before his case moves forward. The court has ordered a psychiatric and/or psychological examination of Demetrius Nathaniel Pitts to determine his competency to stand trial and his ability to exercise his rights related to the defense of his case, according to court documents.
  • Tunisia has released a man two weeks after he was deported there from Germany on suspicion of being an Islamist militant who once served as Osama bin Laden’s bodyguard, a judiciary official said on Friday. Tunis authorities had decided there was not enough evidence to keep holding Sami Aidoudi, but investigations would continue, said Sofian Sliti, spokesman of Tunisia’s anti-terrorist judiciary body.
  • Israeli troopers entered Jerusalem’s al-Aqsa mosque, the third-holiest shrine in Islam, and carried out arrests on Friday in what police described as a pursuit of youths who had lobbed rocks and fireworks during clashes with its forces outside.  The rare raid, on a site that is an emblem of Palestinians’ statehood hopes and a frequent catalyst of their conflict with Israel, came as medics in Gaza said Israeli army gunfire killed two people - including a boy - during a weekly border protest.
  • Pro-Syrian government forces advanced in an Islamic State pocket in southwest Syria on Sunday, a military media unit run by Damascus’ ally Hezbollah reported, despite a threat to hostages the jihadists seized last week. Syrian state television broadcast footage from near the scene of the fighting showing military vehicles moving along a road.
  • The United States has not instituted a policy of regime change or collapse in Iran, U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Friday, saying the goal was still to curb what Washington sees as Iran’s threatening behavior in the Middle East. Mattis made his comments after days of back-and-forth bellicose rhetoric between Iranian and U.S. officials, with President Donald Trump promising dire consequences for Iran if it continues to make threats toward the United States.
  • Islamic State claimed responsibility on Sunday for an attack on a midwife training center in the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad on Saturday that killed three staff. The ultra-hardline militant group, which cited no evidence for its claim in a statement issued via its Amaq news agency, said the attack was carried out by two gunmen.
  • A meeting between a senior U.S. diplomat and Taliban representatives in Doha last week to discuss a possible ceasefire ended with “very positive signals” and a decision to hold more meetings, people with knowledge of the talks said on Sunday. The meeting between a delegation led by Alice Wells, deputy assistant secretary in the State Department’s Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs, and Taliban representatives was first reported in The Wall Street Journal but has not been officially confirmed.
  • An Australian man bought a sawn-off rifle and equipment to make molotov cocktails to be used in a terrorist attack before his arrest in 2014, the Supreme Court in Brisbane has heard. Agim Kruezi, 25, was arrested in counter terrorism raids in September 2014, and has pleaded guilty to making preparatory acts for incursion to a foreign state and acts of preparation for a terrorist attack.
  • The United States on Tuesday froze the assets of three Pakistanis it has linked to Lashkar-e-Taiba, the militant group blamed for the deadly 2008 attacks in India’s financial capital, Mumbai. The State Department added Abdul Rehman al-Dakhil to its list of “specially designated global terrorists,” saying he was a senior commander of the group.
  • Islamic State sought to bolster its claim of responsibility for an attack which killed four Western tourists in Tajikistan, releasing a video on Tuesday purportedly showing attackers pledging allegiance to the militant group. Its claim runs counter to a statement by the Tajik government which accused a banned Islamist opposition party of being behind the attack.
  • Gunmen have stormed a government building in Afghanistan’s eastern city of Jalalabad and taken hostages, after a suicide bomber blew himself up at the entrance gate. There was no immediate claim of responsibility, though ISIS issued a statement denying involvement. One witness, a passerby named Obaidullah, said the attack began when a black car with three occupants pulled up at the entrance to a building used by the department of refugee affairs. A gunman emerged and began firing.
  • Dozens of Islamic State group fighters were cornered in a pocket of Syria's Daraa on Tuesday after losing all other territory there to a Russian-backed regime assault, a monitor said. To get themselves out, IS was using the release of 30 Druze women and children it kidnapped last week as a bargaining chip, said the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.
  • Russia cannot compel Iranian forces to quit Syria, Moscow’s ambassador to Tel Aviv said on Monday, rebuffing Israel’s long-standing demand that it should work to ensure their total withdrawal from the country. Ambassador Anatoly Viktorov said Moscow could equally do nothing to prevent Israeli military strikes against Iranian forces in Syria, which along with Russia and Tehran-backed Lebanese militias are supporting President Bashar al-Assad in combating rebel fighters.
  • Yemen’s Houthi group said on Tuesday it is ready to unilaterally halt attacks in the Red Sea to support peace efforts, days after Saudi Arabia suspended oil exports through a strategic Red Sea channel following an attack on crude tankers last week. Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition has been battling the Iranian-aligned Houthi movement in a three-year-old war, borders the Bab al-Mandeb strait, which is one of the world’s most important trade routes for oil tankers.
  • Yemen's Houthi rebels are still arming themselves with ballistic missiles and drones that "show characteristics similar" to Iranian-made weapons, a report by a UN panel of experts has found. In a confidential report to the Security Council, a copy of which was seen by AFP on Monday, the panel said it "continues to believe" that short-range ballistic missiles and other weaponry were transferred from Iran to Yemen after an arms embargo was imposed in 2015.
  • An Australian man who wanted to use improvised explosives in a domestic terrorism plot after being prevented from fighting in Syria has been jailed for 17 years. Agim Kruezi, 25, pleaded guilty in the Brisbane supreme court on Tuesday to preparing for incursion into a foreign state and preparing or planning for a terrorist act. He was sentenced to 17 years and four months, with a non-parole period of 13 years.
  • Egyptian security forces killed five suspected militants in a shootout in Qalyubiya province, north of Cairo, the interior ministry said in a statement on Tuesday. The ministry said the militants were members of the Hasm group who were instructed to conduct “terrorist operations aimed at destabilizing the country” by movement leaders abroad.
  • The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing at a military checkpoint in Lamitan, a city in the Basilan province of the Philippines. At least 10 people were killed and several others wounded in the blast, according to initial press reports. The so-called caliphate has posted a picture of the bomber, who is identified as Abu Kathir al-Maghrebi (seen above). The suicide bomber’s alias indicates that he is from the Maghreb and likely a Moroccan. Indeed, pro-Islamic State Telegram channels said the “martyr” was from Morocco.
  • Iranian forces have withdrawn their heavy weapons in Syria to a distance of 85 km (53 miles) from the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights, TASS quoted a Russian envoy as saying on Wednesday, but Israel deemed the pullback inadequate. Backed by Russia, Iran, and Lebanon’s Hezbollah Shi’ite militia, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has retaken territory in southern-western Syria from rebels, closing in on the Golan.
  • Russia on Tuesday said there were no plans for a major assault on Syria's Idlib, despite President Bashar al-Assad earlier saying it was a priority to retake the province. "There's currently no question and can be no question of an operation, of a major assault on Idlib," Russia's Syria envoy Alexander Lavrentiev said in remarks reported by Russian agencies. The comments came after talks in the southern Russian city of Sochi backed by Iran and Turkey and with representatives of Damascus and the Syrian rebels.
  • Yemen’s Houthi group said on Tuesday it is unilaterally halting attacks in the Red Sea for two weeks to support peace efforts, days after Saudi Arabia suspended oil exports through a strategic Red Sea channel following attacks on crude tankers last week. Yemen - where a Saudi-led coalition has been battling the Iranian-aligned Houthi movement in a three-year-old war - lies on one of the world’s most important trade routes for oil tankers, the Bab al-Mandeb strait.
  • Iranian hackers have laid the groundwork to carry out extensive cyberattacks on U.S. and European infrastructure and on private companies, and the U.S. is warning allies, hardening its defenses and weighing a counterattack, say multiple senior U.S. officials. Despite Iran having positioned cyber weapons to carry out attacks, there is no suggestion an offensive operation is imminent, according to the officials, who requested anonymity in order to speak.
  • An English court has cleared the way to consider whether it will allow the families of some of those killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the United States to make a claim on Iranian assets in Britain. The relatives want the English High Court to enforce a 2012 decision by a U.S. court which found there was evidence to show that Iran provided “material support and resources to al Qaeda for acts of terrorism”. The militant group carried out the attacks.
  • The Jordanian army said on Thursday it killed several Islamic State militants who approached its border as they fled a Syrian offensive that drove them out of their enclave in the southwest of the war-torn country. Army units had used “all types of weapons” to shell a group of militants who had come close to its side of the Yarmouk Valley in clashes that lasted nearly twenty-fours from Tuesday to Wednesday afternoon, an army source said.
  • Israel said on Thursday it saw potentially stabilizing benefits to President Bashar al-Assad winning the Syrian civil war, after the Israeli military said it killed seven Islamist insurgents in a rare air strike across the countries’ frontier. The remarks by Israel’s defense minister signal an emerging Israeli accommodation with Assad, an old enemy who has not sought direct confrontation with Israel, as he regains control of Syria from rebels - including some Islamist groups.
  • Israel will stop shipments of fuel and gas to the Gaza Strip from Thursday in response to militants in the enclave launching incendiary balloons that have torched fields in Israel. A statement from Defence Minister Avigdor Lieberman’s office on Wednesday said he had ordered a halt to fuel supplies into the strip via the Kerem Shalom crossing until further notice.
  • Israel would deploy its military if Iran were to try to block the Bab al-Mandeb strait that links the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Wednesday. Last week, Saudi Arabia said it was suspending oil shipments through the strait, on the main sea route from the Middle East to Europe, after Yemen’s Iran-aligned Houthis attacked two ships in the waterway.
  • The Taliban claimed it has “completely defeated” the Islamic State’s Khorasan Province in the northern Afghan province of Jawzjan after a coordinated operation that was launched from three different locations. More than 150 Islamic State members, including the group’s military commander for the north, reportedly surrendered to the Afghan government. The complex Taliban operation designed to eject the Islamic State from Jawzjan district, which was confirmed in the Afghan press, highlights the Taliban’s ability to coordinate and mass for attacks in the Afghan north.
  • An armed group robbed a Tunisian bank in the town of Kasserine near the Algerian border on Wednesday in an attack with a “terrorist background”, a Tunisian security official said. Eleven men, some armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles, had hijacked a car and four then stormed the bank and seized an unknown amount of cash, the official said. They later escaped. The security official had no further details.
  • Gunmen attacked a convoy carrying election materials in central Mali, triggering a shootout in which four soldiers and eight attackers were killed, a Defence Ministry spokesman said on Wednesday. The spokesman said the attack occurred late on Tuesday on the road between Nampala and Coura in the south-central region of Segou, giving no further details, and declining to say whether it was carrying ballot papers.
  • Egyptian security forces killed five suspected militants in a shootout in Qalyubiya province, north of Cairo, the interior ministry said in a statement on Tuesday. The ministry said the militants were members of the Hasm group who were instructed to conduct “terrorist operations aimed at destabilizing the country” by movement leaders abroad.
  • The Philippine military said on Thursday it has arrested a Muslim cleric who knew in advance about a bomb that killed 11 people on Basilan island in an attack earlier this week that raised fears of Islamic State involvement. Acting on a tip off, scout rangers raided the home of Indalin Jainul, alias Ustadz Abdulgani, 12 hours after Tuesday’s bombing in Lamitan town.