• The Taliban claimed credit for a suicide attack at a military base that killed several soldiers in the contested district of Nad Ali in Helmand province earlier today. Nad Ali is one of seven contested districts in Helmand. In a statement released on Voice of Jihad, the Taliban’s official website, it said they “killed more than 110 ANA [Afghan National Army], ANP [Afghan National Police] and Arbakis personnel [tribal militia]” in “a martyr attack on a key military center in Shireen Charrahi area.”
  • The U.S. has identified three ISIS leaders accused of executing an ambush last October in Niger that killed four American soldiers. The little-known terrorist group is commonly called ISIS in the Greater Sahara, and has only recently been designated a foreign terrorist organization by the State Department.
  • This morning in Belgium, a knife-wielding man stabbed and killed two police officers in what was potentially a terror-related attack. He proceeded to steal their weapons, take hostages, and was eventually killed by police fire. He was an inmate at a local prison, on temporary release. 
  • Palestinian militants on Tuesday launched their heaviest barrages against Israel since the 2014 Gaza war and Israeli aircraft struck back in a surge of fighting after weeks of border violence. There were no immediate reports of casualties from either side after the Israeli military said more than 25 mortar bombs and rockets were fired from the Gaza Strip in several salvoes in the morning and afternoon.
  • An Afghan man, Gul Nabi, was killed by the Taliban this weekend for his role in minting a gold medal in honor of President Trump. The Taliban claimed responsibility for a bomb attached to Mr. Nabi’s car on Friday. He is the latest in a series of Afghans to be threatened by the Taliban for supporting President Trump.
  • France's anti-terrorism prosecutor says about forty convicted terrorists are due to be released from French prisons this year and next, what he calls a “major risk” to French society. Francois Molins said on television Monday that France still faces a significant threat from homegrown supporters of the struggling Islamic State group.
  • A court in Cameroon has sentenced seven activists from the country's Anglophone minority, including their leader, to up to 15 years in prison for rebellion and acts of "terrorism." The movement accuses President Paul Biya's predominantly Francophone government of marginalizing Cameroon's English-speaking minority, and the protests have recently turned violent.
  • 18-year-old Sudesh Mamoor Faraz Amman, arrested in north London last week, has been charged with making a record of information likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism, and dissemination of terrorist publications. He will appear at Westminster magistrates court on Friday.
  • Today, gunmen armed with assault rifles and grenade launchers stormed the heavily fortified headquarters of the Afghan interior ministry, battling security forces for more than two hours in the latest attack on the capital Kabul. A car bomb was detonated at the entrance of the ministry to launch the attack and then several gunmen managed to get inside the compound, said a senior police official. The attack was carried out by a group of 10 militants and at least one policeman was killed and five were wounded. Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack.
  • In the northern province of Takhar, Taliban fighters in the Dasht-e Qala district center captured the governor’s compound and police headquarters on Wednesday but heavy fighting was continuing, police spokesman Khalil Aseer said. In Loghar, the Taliban claimed an attack on a police station in the provincial capital, Pul-e Alam, which killed three police and wounded 12, among them four police and eight civilians.
  • Afghan forces withdrew from Chora district’s governor’s compound and police headquarters in the embattled southern province of Uruzgan early today. The Taliban has claimed that Chora is under its control and it has also taken over large areas in both Tarin Kot and Khas Uruzgan districts.
  • Today, a U.S. military spokesman released details of an operation conducted last week, in which more than 50 senior Taliban commanders were killed in an artillery strike on a meeting held May 24 in Afghanistan’s southern province of Helmand.
  • On Tuesday, a Russian journalist who fled his homeland last year to escape a campaign of intimidation was shot and killed in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev. The killing of the journalist, Arkady Babchenko, a former war correspondent who stirred fury among Russian nationalists with his sharply critical coverage, is the latest in a series of attacks, on outspoken foes of President Vladimir V. Putin, both inside Russia and beyond.
  • Libya’s oil crescent on Sunday announced a maximum security alert over possible terrorist attacks in vital oil ports and oilfields. Armed guards are now standing by at oil ports, according to the Libyan Express, ready to thwart any terrorist attack that seeks to move into the oil crescent region—Libya’s most prolific oil area.
  • Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip fired more than 70 rockets and mortar shells into Israel on Tuesday, the Israeli military said, as tensions escalated amid weeks of lethal protests and tit-for-tat cross-border attacks. Israel’s military reported that most of the projectiles were downed by its Iron Dome defense system. Later in the day, Israel reported that seven people were injured by the incoming fire, three of them soldiers.  Israel’s military responded with airstrikes on sites across Gaza.