• Afghan police on Monday shot a suspected suicide bomber as he approached a demonstration in the center of the capital Kabul, officials said. His apparent target was a demonstration urging that exiled Vice President Abdul Rashid Dostum be allowed to return to Afghanistan from Turkey.
  • Philippine soldiers arrested the wife of a top leader of a pro-ISIS terrorist group, and killed a suspected bomber in separate raids in a southern city, the army said on Monday. Both individuals were on a list of those President Rodrigo Duterte ordered to be arrested.
  • A suicide bomber struck the Afghan government’s Rural Rehabilitation and Development Ministry in Kabul on Sunday. ISIS quickly claimed responsibility for the attack via its Amaq News Agency, which released a one-page report on the bombing. The so-called caliphate subsequently released another claim of responsibility as well. 
  • Indonesian anti-terrorism officers shot dead three suspected Islamic terrorists on Saturday in the central Java city of Yogyakarta, police said. Iqbal’s statement said the men were believed to be members of Jemaah Ansharut Daulah (JAD), a loose grouping of hundreds of ISIS sympathizers that is on a U.S. State Department terrorist list.
  • Israel and Gaza terrorist groups agreed to a ceasefire on Saturday, a Palestinian official said, after Israel launched dozens of air strikes against the Palestinian enclave’s ruling Hamas terrorist group and gunmen fired more than 100 rockets across the border. But several hours after the announcement, the Israeli military said Palestinians fired two mortar bombs towards Israel and that it responded by striking the weapon used in the attack in the southern Gaza Strip.
  • The death toll from a suicide attack on an election rally in Pakistan’s southwestern Baluchistan province on Friday spiked to 149, officials said, putting it among the deadliest attacks in the south Asian nation’s history. Friday’s attack at a rally for the Baluchistan Awami Party (BAP) outside the town of Mastung was claimed by ISIS. Among the dead was the party’s provincial candidate, Siraj Raisani.
  • The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) released its latest report on civilian casualties in Afghanistan on Monday, identifying the Taliban as the prime culprit when it comes to civilian deaths and injuries. The total number of civilian casualties remained at record high levels during the first six months of 2018 with 5,122 civilians killed or wounded.
  • About 20 Nigerian soldiers are missing after a clash with Boko Haram terrorists in the northeast of the country, security sources said on Monday, though the military denied reports that some troops could not be found. The confrontation between terrorists and troops took place on Saturday in the Bama area of Borno, the state worst hit by the terrorist group which has killed more than 30,000 people since 2009 when it launched an insurgency to create an Islamic caliphate.
  • Gunmen shot dead 14 civilians in an attack on a village in northeastern Mali, a local official said on Monday, amid a spate of killings by rival ethnic groups and jihadist terrorists that threatens to derail a presidential election later this month. The terrorists - some that are connected to al Qaeda - first seized control over Mali’s desert in 2012 before being pushed back by a French-led intervention.
  • A terrorism network founded in Wales is suspected of a number of attacks in Bangladesh. The cell was started by respected south Wales businessman Siful Sujan, who had companies based in Cardiff. The American military said he was a key figure in ISIS before he was killed by a US drone strike in Syria in 2015.
  • Over the weekend, al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, launched a coordinated suicide assault on Somalia’s presidential palace compound in Mogadishu. Several people were killed in the strike, however, the numbers vary from three to ten. Somali authorities have said that only five terrorists in total were involved in the assault and that three terrorists were killed in the firefights.
  • Nigerian police said on Wednesday that eight suspected members of Boko Haram had confessed to involvement in the 2014 abduction of some 270 girls from the northeastern village of Chibok. The mass abduction of their girls from their school caused global outrage and drew attention to the terrorist group which has been trying to create an Islamic state in northeast Nigeria since 2009.
  • ISIS terrorists attacked the house of a Taliban commander in the northern Afghan province of Sar-e Pul on Tuesday, killing at least 15 people as they were attending a prayer ceremony, the provincial governor’s office said. The attack followed reports from local officials of fighting between ISIS and Taliban terrorists in other northern provinces over recent days.
  • On Monday night, Afghan commandos raided a Taliban jail in the highly contested province of Helmand and freed 58 prisoners, according to the Afghan military. The Taliban has been operating prisons in Helmand for at least three years.
  • ISIS is creeping back into parts of central Iraq just seven months after the government declared victory in the war against the group, embarking on a wave of kidnappings, assassinations and bombings that have raised fears that a new cycle of insurgency is starting again. The Iraqi security forces have launched operations over the past two weeks aimed at rooting out the terrorists, and they have claimed some successes.
  • An Israeli air strike in the Gaza Strip killed a member of the Islamist terrorist group Hamas on Thursday and wounded two others, Hamas sources and medical officials said. The Israeli military confirmed in a statement that it had carried out an air strike.
  • Malaysia has detained seven people for suspected terrorist-linked activities, including a man who allegedly made death threats against the country’s king and prime minister, police said on Thursday. The Muslim-majority country has been on high alert since ISIS carried out a series of attacks in Jakarta, the capital of neighboring Indonesia, in January 2016.
  • A California man pleaded guilty on Wednesday to opening social media accounts to provide support to ISIS, according to court documents. Amer Sinan Alhaggagi, 23, said he opened Twitter and Facebook accounts for two people he believed to be ISIS supporters, and some of the Twitter accounts were subsequently used by the group to distribute news.
  • Several roadside bombs and mortar rounds wounded 11 people in the northern Iraqi oil city of Kirkuk on Wednesday, witnesses said. Security forces in Iraq have largely defeated ISIS, removing them from Mosul and other cities and towns. But the hardline Sunni terrorist group still carries out attacks near Kirkuk and some other parts of the country.
  • A Texas man was found guilty this week of a hate crime in the burning of a local mosque in January 2017, an attack that a rights group on Wednesday connected to an increase in anti-Muslim incidents in the United States. The fire destroyed the Victoria Islamic Center and caused about $500,000 in damages, according to the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
  • Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham (HTS) and Bashar al-Assad’s regime are conducting another swap of prisoners and civilians. According to HTS, 1,500 prisoners held by Assad and his allies are being released. In exchange, HTS must leave the towns and residents are allowed to evacuate as well.
  • Al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, has captured a small but strategic town 100 km (60 miles) south of Bosaso city in the semi-autonomous Puntland region, a military officer, al Shabaab and residents said on Friday. Al Shabaab wants to topple Somalia’s Western-backed central government, expel the African Union-mandated peace keeping force AMISOM, and establish a government based on its own strict interpretation of Islamic sharia law.
  • An Algerian man accused of recruiting an American woman known as “Jihad Jane” in 2009 and who originally pleaded not guilty to a U.S. charge of supporting terrorism, is expected to change his plea to guilty, a court filing showed on Thursday. Ali Charaf Damache, 53, a dual Irish and Algerian citizen, was extradited to the United States last year and while none of the plans U.S. prosecutors accused him of resulted in attacks, authorities said he was in direct contact with Islamist terrorists in Pakistan and recruited two American women to help him.
  • Turkish authorities detained the wife of Abu Omar al-Shishani, a senior ISIS commander killed in combat two years ago, in a counter-terrorism operation in Istanbul this month, police said late on Thursday. His wife was one five people detained in simultaneous raids across Istanbul on the night of July 4 that targeted people believed to have connections with conflict zones and actively seeking to carry out attacks, police said in a statement.
  • Israel’s Mossad spy agency thwarted a terror attack in a Paris suburb last month, giving authorities in France, Germany, and Belgium crucial intelligence that led to arrests of a cell headed by an Iranian diplomat, Hebrew media reported Thursday. The cell, headed by an Iranian diplomat at the Austrian embassy in Vienna, also consisted of  two Belgian nationals and an alleged accomplice in France. They planned to bomb a June 30 conference organized by an Iranian dissident group, the People’s Mujahedeen of Iran.
  • The State Department announced on Thursday that the US government’s terror designation for al Shabaab has been amended to include Al-Hijra, a “wing” of the group based in Kenya. Al Shabaab is al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia and East Africa, a fact that it continues to advertise even as it wages a prolific insurgency against Somali forces and their international allies.
  • A Turkish court has rejected the Australian Government's bid to extradite ISIS terrorist Neil Prakash to face terrorism charges there. In his verdict, the Turkish judge rejected the prosecutor's request for extradition, saying the conditions for the extradition had not been made available to the court.