• A man who stabbed two American tourists at Amsterdam’s central station last week named Dutch, anti-Islam lawmaker Geert Wilders during police questioning and said he was motivated by perceived insults to Islam in the Netherlands, prosecutors said on Monday. The man, identified by Dutch media as Jawed S., is a 19-year-old Afghan with residency in Germany, who traveled to Amsterdam to carry out an attack because of what he said were repeated insults to God, the Koran and Islam’s Prophet Mohammed, prosecutors said in a statement.
  • Jalaluddin Haqqani, founder of the militant Haqqani network, one of the most powerful and feared groups in the Afghan insurgency, has died after a long illness, the Taliban said on Tuesday. Haqqani, who founded the network in the 1970s, gave up operational leadership of the group some years ago to his son Sirajuddin, who is now deputy leader of the Afghan Taliban, with a $5-million U.S. bounty on his head. “Haqqani had become quite old and was suffering from different health problems,” said one Taliban source close to the Haqqani family.
  • The US military confirmed that it killed Abu Saad Orakzai, the Islamic State’s emir for its Khorasan province, in an airstrike in Nangarhar, Afghanistan on Aug. 25. The Afghan government had previously announced his death, but the report was not confirmed. “The strike resulted in his death,” according to a press release that was issued by Resolute Support, NATO’s command in Afghanistan. The airstrike targeted Orakzai, who is also known as Abu Sayed Bajauri and Abu Sayad Erhabi, “in the eastern area of the Nangarhar province,” and was carried out by US Forces-Afghanistan.
  • One US service member was killed and another was wounded in what the military described as "an apparent insider attack" in eastern Afghanistan on Monday. The service member, whose identity has not yet been released, is the sixth American to be killed in Afghanistan this year, according to a statement from the NATO-led coalition in Afghanistan, Resolute Support. The wounded service member is in stable condition, according to the statement.
  • An Indian court has convicted two members of an outlawed Islamist militant group over twin blasts in the southern city of Hyderabad in 2007. At least 42 people were killed and more than 60 wounded in explosions at an open-air auditorium and a restaurant. The two members of Indian Mujahideen will be sentenced on 10 September.
  • At least 31 policemen in Indian-administered Kashmir have been killed by militants this year, according to official estimates. Policemen, many of them local Muslims, have become the most vulnerable targets as violence escalates in the region. In recent months, they have even been advised to avoid visiting their homes. If they do, they should take "extreme precautions", particularly in the southern region, said the Director General of Jammu and Kashmir Police, Shesh Paul Vaid.
  • Israel signaled on Monday that it could attack suspected Iranian military assets in Iraq, as it has done with scores of air strikes in war-torn Syria. Citing Iranian, Iraqi and Western sources, Reuters reported last week that Iran had transferred short-range ballistic missiles to Shi’ite allies in Iraq in recent months. Tehran and Baghdad formally denied that report.
  • Vail Ja'abari, 36, from Hebron attempted Monday to stab an IDF soldier at the entrance to the Geva Haavot neighborhood in Kiryat Arba.   The terrorist was shot dead by IDF soldiers standing at the Geva Haavot checkpoint. At about 6 pm Ja'abari approached a group of soldiers that were standing at the entrance to the neighborhood located between Kiryat Arba and Hebron and attempted to stab one of the soldiers.
  • Iran called on Monday for militants to be “cleaned out” of Syria’s Idlib province, as it prepared for talks with Syria and Russia about confronting the last major enclave held by rebels opposed to President Bashar al-Assad. Syrian government forces are planning a phased offensive in Idlib and surrounding areas held by insurgents fighting Assad, who has been backed by both Russian and Iranian forces in the country’s conflict.
  • Egyptian security forces detained a man on Tuesday after an explosive device detonated near the U.S. Embassy in central Cairo, three security sources said. No casualties were reported, the sources said. A witness said she heard a blast and then saw a man with a backpack that had caught on fire close to the Semiramis Hotel, across the road from the embassy premises.
  • The Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen said on Monday it had intercepted and destroyed a ballistic missile fired at the southern Saudi city of Jizan by the Iranian-aligned Houthis, who said separately they were targeting a Saudi Aramco facility. There were no reports of damage by the coalition, in a tweet by Saudi-owned Al Arabiya TV, or the Houthis, in a tweet by their al-Masirah TV.
  • Eleven members of the Haqqani militant network have been arrested in the Afghan capital, the National Directorate of Security said on Wednesday, a day after the Taliban announced the death of the group’s founder. The 11 were arrested and weapons, ammunition and a large amount of explosives were seized during an operation by Afghan special forces, the NDS said in a statement. It did not say when the arrests were made.
  • Al Qaeda is trying to regain its primacy over international militancy as Islamic State loses ground, a senior NATO official said on Tuesday, seeing a potentially increased risk to the West from the groups’ rivalry. But Arndt von Loringhoven, the alliance’s assistant secretary general for intelligence and security, said Islamic State retained some personnel strength despite its combat losses, including fresh recruits among women and children.
  • Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) has released a lengthy video documenting its efforts to uproot an alleged Saudi spy network that helped hunt down some of the group’s most senior figures. The production is titled, “The Preliminary Introduction [to] Demolishing the Espionage,” and is intended to be the first in a series. FDD’s Long War Journal cannot independently verify the claims made in the video. Some details conflict with published reports. But it is noteworthy that AQAP is blaming the Saudis for some of its high-profile leadership losses.
  • Turkey told the United States on Tuesday that Kurdish militants must completely abandon Syria, as violence in the rebel-held northern Syrian enclave of Idlib escalated. Turkish Defence Minister Hulusi Akar made the call during talks with visiting U.S. special representative for Syria James Jeffrey, the defense ministry said in a statement.
  • Israeli planes targeted military positions in Syria on Tuesday, but Syrian air defenses confronted and downed some of the rockets, Syrian state news agency SANA reported. Citing a military source, SANA said that Israeli aircraft had targeted “our military positions in the provinces of Tartous and Hama”. “The enemy missiles were dealt with and some of them were shot down,” SANA said.
  • Gunmen from Somalia’s Al Shabaab group killed six people including at least four soldiers in the streets of the capital, a day after the Islamist movement kidnapped scores of elders in a central region, officials said. The militants drove up to a tuk-tuk vehicle carrying the soldiers in Mogadishu’s Karan district and opened fire, killing all four of them on Tuesday, police said.
  • A Malaysian scientist who once led Al Qaeda’s quest to produce weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in Afghanistan will be released from prison next year, according to Malaysian police, who warn that he remains a security risk. Yazid Sufaat, 54, an Al Qaeda operative who helped set up a laboratory in Kandahar, Afghanistan where he tried to cultivate anthrax, has been jailed three times by Malaysian authorities for terror-related offences in the past 16 years.
  • The son of a Boston police captain was sentenced to 20 years behind bars and supervised release until his death for planning bombings and other violence in the name of ISIS, prosecutors announced Wednesday. Alexander Ciccolo, 26, of Adams, Massachusetts, also went by Ali Al Amriki as he plotted to attack a university with pressure-cooker bombs and firearms, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston. He tried to recruit people to help, prosecutors said.
  • A Queens man awaiting sentencing for his failed attempts to join the Islamic State is facing new charges for gleefully stabbing a prison guard — and then praying for his jailor’s death. Ali Saleh was slapped Wednesday with new charges for allegedly knifing a correctional officer at Brooklyn’s Metropolitan Detention Center on July 13, according to court filings and a law enforcement source.
  • The State Department announced today that it has added Jama’at Nusrat al-Islam wal-Muslimin (JNIM), al Qaeda’s branch in Mali and West Africa, to the US government’s terrorist designation lists. JNIM was established in Mar. 2017, bringing together several preexisting al Qaeda groups under a common banner. The leader of JNIM is Iyad Ghaly, a Malian Tuareg jihadist. Ghaly is openly loyal to al Qaeda, as well as the emir of the Taliban.
  • A suicide bomber detonated himself at a sports club hosting a wrestling match in the Afghan capital earlier today. As emergency personnel and the media converged on the scene, a second, larger explosion rocked the area. The follow-on blast was apparently caused when a car packed with explosives was remotely detonated, though there is some uncertainty concerning the exact details. The attacks were claimed by the Islamic State, which issued a report via its Amaq News Agency and then a second statement. The jihadists claim that upwards of 150 people were killed or injured.
  • Saudi Arabia’s air defense forces intercepted and destroyed a ballistic missile fired by Yemen’s Houthis in the southern city of Najran, wounding 26 people with shrapnel, Saudi civil defense said on Wednesday. The Houthi-run al-Masirah TV said on Twitter the group had hit a Saudi National Guard camp in the border city. The Saudi-led coalition fighting the Houthis said the missile launched from Saada province had been detected at 2008 (1708 GMT).
  • President Trump, who just five months ago said he wanted “to get out” of Syria and bring U.S. troops home soon, has agreed to a new strategy that indefinitely extends the military effort there and launches a major diplomatic push to achieve American objectives, according to senior State Department officials. Although the military campaign against the Islamic State has been nearly completed, the administration has redefined its goals to include the exit of all Iranian military and proxy forces from Syria, and establishment of a stable, nonthreatening government acceptable to all Syrians and the international community.
  • The US Treasury announced sanctions Thursday targeting a network of business groups that supplies fuels to the regime of Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad, along with one that handles regime trade with the Islamic State group. The Treasury said the four individuals and five companies added to its financial blacklist were important to helping Assad's regime obtain much-needed crude oil and fuels despite sanctions on Syria.
  • Israel reportedly armed and funded at least 12 rebel groups in southern Syria to prevent Iranian-sponsored insurgents affiliated with Islamic State from becoming embedded near the Golan, according to a report in Foreign Policy magazine. Testimonies from more than 20 commanders in Foreign Policy noted that Israel supplied the weapons and cash to rebel groups throughout “Operation Good Neighbor” – launched in 2016 and shut down in July once the Assad regime regained control of the Syrian side of the Golan Heights – to keep troops belonging to Hezbollah and Iran away from the border of the Israeli-controlled Golan Heights.
  • Three mortar shells landed inside Baghdad’s heavily fortified Green Zone just after midnight local time on Friday, the Iraqi military said in a statement. The mortars landed on an “abandoned lot,” resulting in “no casualties or physical damage,” the statement said. A security source inside the Green Zone said the mortars landed near the Egyptian embassy.
  • Iraq’s most revered Shi’ite cleric called for a political shakeup in Baghdad and a halt to violence against demonstrators on Friday, after days of deadly protests tore through the main city in the south and shut the country’s main sea port. Ayatollah Ali Sistani, the ultimate authority for most members of Iraq’s Shi’ite majority, placed blame for the unrest with political leaders and said a new government should be formed, “different from its predecessors”.
  • Residents of Tripoli emerging from their homes to take advantage of a ceasefire between armed groups noticed one thing straight away. The militias had not withdrawn their heavy weapons from strategic locations in the Libyan capital. A truce brokered by the United Nations on Tuesday after a week of violence between local fighters has largely been observed.
  • Gregory Lazarchick, a 56-year-old from New Jersey, was booked into the Orange County Jail on Tuesday after police accused him of threatening to blow up Disney World for the terrorist group Al-Qaeda, according to Spectrum News 13. He made the threats on July 21 to a greeter at the Saratoga Springs Resort & Spa, one of the hotels located on Disney World property, police say. An arrest affidavit says that a greeter at the hotel told Lazarchick to “have a great day” — to which he responded “I don’t want to have a great day,” according to WFTV9. Police say he then told the greeter that “Al-Qaeda sent me here to blow the place up,” according to Spectrum News13. Lazarchick told the employee that his comments weren’t a joke, police say, and authorities arrived to the hotel to interview the man.