Mr. Speaker, the United States made the critical difference in the war to end all wars, World War I. The American doughboys turned the tide to victory in favor of the Allies in 1918, but victory was costly. 

More Americans gave their lives in the hellish trench warfare than in the wars of Korea and Vietnam combined. Now, 100 years later, Americans will be reminded of the courage and sacrifice of our doughboys with each letter they write. 

At the end of this month, the United States Postal Service will release a new stamp commemorating the 100th anniversary of American victory in World War I. The stamp depicts a soldier of the American Expeditionary Force, one of 4 million young men who answered our Nation’s call to ‘‘go over there.’’

As George Cohan wrote: ‘‘They didn’t come back till it was over, over there.’’ Mr. Speaker, this stamp serves to honor the millions of doughboys who fought during the Great War, because the worst casualty of war is to be forgotten. 

And that is just the way it is.