• ISIS terrorists killed three government-backed militia fighters on Monday near Iraq’s biggest oil refinery in the northern city of Baiji, police and militia sources said. Police sources said at least seven terrorists opened fire on the militia forces in Baiji. Four of the attackers were killed and at least two others were still at large, they said.
  • A member of Saudi Arabia’s security forces and a Bangladeshi resident were killed in an attack on a security checkpoint in Buraidah, a city in Qassim Province north of the capital Riyadh, the state news agency said on Sunday. While no one has claimed the attack, analysts say many young men from the region joined al Qaeda in Yemen or terrorist groups in Iraq.
  • At least six members of Tunisia’s security forces were killed on Sunday in an ambush in the northwest of the country close to the border with Algeria. Terrorists operate in the remote areas near the border with Algeria, which has been fighting the remnants of a major Islamist insurgency in the 1990s.
  • Syrian military air defenses struck an Israeli warplane and shot down Israeli missiles targeting the T4 air base in Homs province in response to an act of “aggression” on Sunday night, Syrian state media said. Israel’s air force has struck scores of Iranian deployments or arms transfers to Lebanon’s Iran-backed Hezbollah.
  • Suspected Islamist terrorists killed two workers and kidnapped two others at a water plant in southeastern Libya early on Saturday, the second attack targeting water facilities in two days, officials said. The statement said the attack bore the hallmarks of an ISIS terrorist.
  • U.S. and Afghan Special Forces are completing an operation to clear ISIS terrorists from a remote district in Nangarhar, the eastern province where they have their main stronghold in Afghanistan, officials said on Saturday. The operation in Deh Bala, on the border with Pakistan, began at the end of April and was largely complete in early June but final mine clearance operations are still under way, said Lt. Col. Josh Thiel, from the U.S. First Special Forces Group.
  • One U.S. service member was killed and two others wounded in an apparent insider attack in southern Afghanistan, the NATO-led Resolute Support mission said on Saturday. In a statement, the Taliban said a member of the Afghan security forces opened fire on U.S. troops in the southern province of Uruzgan, killing four people and wounding several others.
  • At least five people were killed and 21 wounded on Saturday when terrorists from al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, set off two bombs in central Mogadishu and stormed a government building. In a separate incident on Saturday, a roadside bomb killed a former district commissioner in the Lower Shabelle region and wounded three others, according to police. Al shabaab also claimed responsibility for that attack.
  • Haidar al Jubouri, also known as Abu Shahad, the leader of the Iranian-backed Liwa Zulfiqar, was spotted in a recent video from a Syrian military operations command room in Deraa. This further proves that despite claims to the contrary, Iranian-backed groups are taking part in the Deraa offensive and at least two of these groups are officially integrated into Syrian command structure.
  • A suicide bomber in Afghanistan killed at least 12 people, including several children, on Tuesday, in an attack in the eastern city of Jalalabad claimed by ISIS terrorists. The attacker detonated his explosives near a petrol pump, killing two officials working for Afghanistan’s intelligence agency, and sparking a big fire.
  • Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb’s (AQIM) branch in Tunisia, the Uqba bin Nafi Battalion, claimed credit for a deadly assault on Tunisian police officers on Monday near Ghardimau in northwestern Tunisia. At least six police officers were killed after the terrorists ambushed their patrol with grenades and small-arms fire.
  • U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, on a surprise visit to Afghanistan on Monday, promised support for President Ashraf Ghani’s bid to start peace talks with the Taliban and repeated the United States would be willing to take part.
  • The Taliban railed against an upcoming conference of religious scholars that will be held in Saudi Arabia later this week as “illegitimate” and urged Islamic clerics to boycott the meeting. In a statement released on July 7 on Voice of Jihad, the Taliban’s official website, the group described the meeting as a US-orchestrated effort to delegitimize the Taliban’s insurgency.
  • The leader of Kata’ib Sayyid al Shuhada (KSS), an Iraqi Shia militia with close ties to Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC), recently stated that he is willing to send his men to Yemen to fight alongside the Houthis against the Saudi-led coalition in the country. Shia militias around the Middle East have made it clear that they view the Houthis as part of the “axis of resistance,” a network of state and non-state actors led by Iran that operates against the US and its allies.
  • Terrorists attacked an education department office in the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad on Wednesday and held out against security forces for some four hours before the assault ended with at least 10 people killed, officials said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for Wednesday’s attack but both of the other assaults in the city this month were claimed by ISIS.
  • Egyptian security forces have killed 11 suspected terrorists in a shootout in al-Arish, the capital of North Sinai province, state news agency reported on Wednesday, as authorities pushed ahead with an operation to crush ISIS. The report did not mention any casualties or wounded among the security forces.
  • A suicide bomber blew himself up at a rally by an anti-Taliban political party in Pakistan, killing 20 people, including a candidate in July 25 elections, police and hospital officials said on Wednesday. The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility for the Tuesday attack.
  • ISIS claimed a suicide bombing west of Daraa in southern Syria on Tuesday, saying 50 men from the “Crusader Russian Forces” and “the Apostate Nusayri Army” (a derogatory reference to Bashar al Assad’s soldiers) were killed or wounded in the explosion. The Assad regime, along with its Russian and Iranian-backed allies, launched an offensive in Daraa in mid-June.
  • The US State Department added the Bahraini Shia militia Saraya al Ashtar to the US government’s list of designated terrorist organizations on Tuesday. Saraya al Ashtar is one of many Iranian-backed groups operating within the island kingdom.
  • Italian authorities have arrested a Macedonian man accused of preparing for a terrorist attack. Also Tuesday, the interior ministry said it had expelled a Tunisian man who arrived in Italy in 2014 with a residency permit to study but developed links with jihadis.
  • A Taliban attack on an Afghan army outpost near the northern city of Kunduz has killed at least 29 soldiers, while air strikes in other parts of the country killed dozens of terrorists, officials said on Thursday. Kunduz, a strategic northern city which the Taliban have come close to taking twice in the past three years, has been relatively calm but fighting has picked up since the end of a three-day truce during last month’s Eid al-Fitr holiday.
  • The United States and the United Arab Emirates have broken up a network funneling illicit funds to Iran as Washington steps up a drive to restrict Iranian trade and access to hard currency in the region, a senior U.S. official said on Thursday. “We jointly disrupted a currency exchange network that was transferring millions of dollars to Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps’ Quds Force,” said Sigal Mandelker, Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence at the U.S. Treasury.
  • Somali media reported airstrikes that killed eight of al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, terrorists on July 10. U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) denied responsibility for the strikes on Twitter on Wednesday.  AFRICOM stated that the U.S. has not conducted any strikes in Somalia since the beginning of June.
  • Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) claimed three attacks in al Bayda governorate, central Yemen since the beginning of July. AQAP claimed to ambush and kill two al Houthi troops on July 1 and two al Houthi investigations directorate guards on July 7. AQAP also claimed to kill four al Houthi troops, including a local commander, in the Tayyab area of southern al Bayda on July 10.
  • ISIS has claimed responsibility for Sunday’s attack on a security checkpoint in Saudi Arabia, the group’s online publication said on Friday. A Saudi security force member and a foreigner were killed in the attack in Buraidah, a city in Qassim Province north of the capital Riyadh, the Saudi Press Agency said on Sunday.
  • An air strike, probably carried out by U.S.-led international forces or Iraq, struck an ISIS-held area of eastern Syria, killing 54 people including 28 civilians as well as members of the terrorist group, a war monitor said on Friday. Colonel Sean Ryan, a spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition, said that it or “partner forces may have conducted strikes in the vicinity”.
  • A suicide bomber hit a campaign convoy in southwestern Pakistan, a police official said, killing 10 people in the second election-related attack on Friday amid tensions over ousted prime minister Nawaz Sharif’s return ahead of July 25 elections. Earlier in the day, a bomb blast killed four people in the northern town of Bannu when it struck the campaign convoy of Akram Khan Durrani, an ally of Sharif’s party from the religious Muttahida Majlis-e-Amal party.
  • A U.S. service member died on Thursday after being wounded during a combat operation in eastern Afghanistan, the U.S. military said in a statement. An Afghan security force member was also killed and several were wounded in the incident, less than a week after a U.S. soldier was killed in an insider attack in southern Afghanistan.
  • The Afghan military “suffered heavy casualties” during a Taliban assault in a contested district in the northern province of Kunduz on Wednesday night. The attack was reportedly executed by the Taliban’s Red Unit, the group’s shock troops who are better trained than the average fighter.