• A suicide bomber killed 13 people and wounded more than 25 during rush hour on Monday at the entrance to Afghanistan’s rural rehabilitation and development ministry in Kabul as workers were leaving for home, government spokesmen said. ISIS claimed responsibility, its AMAQ news agency said, without providing any evidence.
  • At least 15 pro-ISIS terrorists were killed when Philippine troops launched air and ground assaults against a rebel bomb factory on Sunday, a military commander said. The terrorists in southern Philippines have regrouped and were retraining and recruiting new members for future attacks after occupying the southern city of Marawi for five months last year, the military has said.
  • Afghan security forces on Sunday seized 156 sacks of ammonium nitrate, widely used in making explosives, from the back of a vegetable truck crossing from Pakistan, an official said, in one of the biggest such finds. Afghanistan faces insurgencies by the Taliban, ISIS and the Taliban-linked Haqqani network.
  • A U.S. Special Forces soldier was killed on Friday in an ambush by al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab. At least four other U.S. Special Forces personnel, as well as one Somali special forces soldier, were also wounded. On Saturday, Shabaab again targeted the base with a suicide car bomb. This time, Somali authorities reported that forces within the base were able to kill the driver before he was able to get close to the base perimeter and inflict serious damage.
  • Kosovo has arrested two people, including a Belgian national, suspected of planning attacks on NATO troops and the public in Kosovo, Belgium and France, the state prosecutor said on Friday. The prosecutor’s office said in a statement that on June 2 the pair, a man and a woman, spoke by telephone of preparing terrorist attacks.
  • The U.S. embassy in Mozambique said Americans should consider leaving a northeastern district close to a major gas field as imminent attacks are likely after suspected Islamist terrorists beheaded 10 people and killed seven others since May. Mozambique has little history of terrorist activity and police have been reluctant to ascribe the attacks to Islamists.
  • The Afghan Taliban denounced “American occupying forces” for attacking their Voice of Shariah Radio station in the central province of Ghazni, but the United States denied the charge and said Afghan air force planes had targeted a broadcasting tower. A spokesman for the NATO-led Resolute Support mission said the Taliban statement “speaks volumes with regards to the capabilities” of the Afghan air force.
  • Taliban terrorists killed a district governor in northern Afghanistan and kept up the pressure to seize control over some parts of Faryab province, ignoring the temporary ceasefire announced by the government that came into effect on Tuesday. At least eight Afghan security officials have been killed in the ongoing clashes, two officials said.
  • Police arrested two teens in Virginia who were planning a terrorist attack at a high school prom over the weekend, authorities said Monday. Michael Coleman, 18, and an unnamed 17-year-old were arrested and charged with conspiring to commit a terrorist attack at the Bayside High School prom in Virginia Beach, Virginia, on June 9, police stated.
  • A New York man has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for trying to join ISIS, despite telling the judge he only wanted to provide humanitarian aid to Syrians. The U.S. District Court judge told Arafat Nagi (NAH'-gee) on Monday he found his humanitarian claims hard to believe in light of graphic social media posts of ISIS violence and a photo of Nagi posing with an assault rifle.
  • Israel’s security agency, Shin Bet, has prevented 250 terror attacks so far in 2018, Director Nadav Argaman told a group of visiting interior security ministers at a closed session of a Jerusalem international conference on terror on Wednesday. Argaman said that the Shin Bet was striking the right balance between continuing its effective human intelligence collection programs and new cyber intelligence gathering abilities.
  • Units from the Kenya Defence Forces and national police have deployed around the country and specifically near the Somali border near Lamu due to concerns that al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, may conduct an attack to mark the end of Ramadan. Suspected al Shabaab fighters have recently been spotted in the Boni forest in Lamu County.
  • The Taliban denied on Tuesday that any of its representatives were in “secret talks” with Afghan, NATO or US officials. Yet again, the Taliban stated that it will only negotiate peace after US and NATO forces withdraw from Afghanistan.
  • A Catholic catechetical building was damaged by Boko Haram terrorists during an attack Monday on a village in northwestern Nigeria. The terrorists burned 22 buildings during the raid, including part of the Catechetical Training Centre in Kaya, according to the Catholic Diocese of Maiduguri. Reportedly, the terrorists had been looting and searching for food.
  • Israel has attacked Iranian-backed Shi’ite Muslim militias in Syria, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Thursday. Israeli officials have previously disclosed scores of air strikes within Syria to prevent suspected arms transfers to Lebanon’s Iranian-supported terrorist group Hezbollah or Iranian military deployments. But they have rarely given detail on the operations, or described non-Lebanese militiamen as having been targeted.
  • Two worshippers were stabbed to death and another two injured on Thursday at a mosque near South Africa’s tourist city of Cape Town by an attacker who was shot dead by police. Police said the attack near Durban showed “elements of extremism”. They did not comment further on the motive behind the killings.
  • Turkish authorities on Thursday detained 18 suspected ISIS members in Istanbul and Izmir, two of Turkey biggest cities, officials said. The suspects were thought be providing financial support to the organization, had traveled to and from conflict zones and been trained to carry out suicide bombings.
  • An al Qaeda affiliate in Mali has released a video of a French aid worker and a Colombian nun kidnapped in separate incidents in 2016 and 2017, according to SITE Intelligence Group. The video was posted late on Wednesday by Jama’a Nusrat ul-Islam wa al-Muslimin (JNIM), which has been linked to the kidnapping of at least six Western hostages in recent years.
  • Al Qaeda’s branch in Somalia, al Shabaab, terrorists attacked an African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) military base containing both Somali and Ethiopian troops in Qansahdhere town, Bay region, southern Somalia on June 12. Al Shabaab killed two soldiers in the attack.
  • A Finnish court sentenced Abderrahman Bouanane, a failed Moroccan asylum seeker, to life in prison on Friday for stabbing two women to death and wounding eight other people last year in the Nordic country’s first Islamist terror attack. Bouanane, who was 22 at the time, went on his knife rampage in the market square in the city of Turku last August. Police stopped the attacks by shooting Bouanane in the leg.
  • Unidentified gunmen shot dead a prominent newspaper editor and two security guards in India’s Kashmir on Thursday, police said. There was no immediate word from police on the identity or possible motive of the gunmen.
  • Debris from five missiles fired at Saudi Arabia by Yemen’s Houthi group since July 2017 “share key design features with a known type of missile” manufactured by Iran and some of the components were manufactured in Iran, U.N. chief Antonio Guterres wrote in a confidential report to the Security Council. However, the United Nations has not been able to determine when the missiles, components or related technology were transferred from Iran and if they violated U.N. restrictions.
  • U.S. forces working in coordination with the Libyan government carried out an air strike against an al Qaeda affiliate group southeast of Bani Walid this week, killing one fighter, U.S. military said in a statement on Thursday. It said no civilians were killed in the attack.
  • A spokesman for Afghanistan’s Ministry of Defense claimed that Mullah Fazlullah, the emir of the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan (TTP), was killed in a US airstrike in the remote Afghan province of Kunar on June 13. The US military confirmed the strike took place and targeted “a senior leader of a designated terrorist organization” but has not announced Fazlullah’s death.