• At least 20 people were killed on Tuesday in a bomb blast outside the Supreme Court in the center of Afghanistan's capital, Kabul, government officials said, in what appeared to be the latest in a series of attacks on the judiciary. The Ministry of Public Health said at least 20 people were killed and 38 injured people were taken to city hospitals. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attack, in which police said an apparent suicide bomber targeted Supreme Court employees leaving their offices at the end of the working day.
  • At least 30 people died in air strikes on the rebel-held Syrian city of Idlib on Tuesday, in some of the heaviest raids there in months, witnesses and rescue workers said. Around eight attacks by what witnesses believed to be Russian jets wounded scores of people and leveled several multi-story buildings in residential areas of the northwestern city, they added. Russia's Defense Ministry later claimed that the media reports that its planes had bombed Idlib were not true.
  • Syrian government forces advanced on the northern ISIS-held city of al-Bab on Monday, cutting off the last supply route that connects it to terrorist strongholds further east towards Iraq, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. ISIS fighters in the area are now effectively surrounded by the army from the south and by Turkish-backed rebels from the north, as Damascus and Ankara race to capture the largest ISIS stronghold in Aleppo province. Backed by air strikes, Syrian government forces severed a road that links the city to other ISIS-held territory in Raqqa and Deir al-Zor provinces.
  • The U.S. embassy in Baghdad said on Monday it has limited the movement of its personnel after receiving "credible threats of possible attacks on hotels frequented by Westerners," however it did not give details on the nature of the threat.
  • Terrorist groups are using people smugglers to recruit desperate unaccompanied migrant children, who pledge allegiance to jihadists in order to continue their migration journey, a report found on Monday. At least 88,300 lone migrant children are at risk of being radicalized in Europe, according to Quilliam, a counter-extremism organization that operates across Europe and North America. The report said groups like ISIS, as well as Boko Haram recruited people living in refugee camps by paying money, and by funding the onward journey of child migrants if they joined their group.
  • A Palestinian rocket launched from Gaza struck Israel on Monday, causing no casualties or damage, in a rare attack that drew Israeli air strikes against Palestinian militant targets. A 70-year-old Palestinian man was slightly wounded in one of the Israeli strikes, but he was the only reported injury on either side of a frontier that has been largely quiet in recent months.
  • Egyptian soldiers killed 14 terrorists and arrested ten others in a raid in central Sinai, the military said on Monday. The operation over the past five days destroyed three car bombs and 10 other explosive devices and seized weapons, communication devices and military clothing, the army spokesman added. An Islamist insurgency in the Sinai Peninsula has gained pace since the military toppled President Mohamed Mursi of the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's oldest Islamist movement, in 2013 following mass protests against him. Sinai Province, the terrorists group behind the insurgency, pledged allegiance to ISIS in 2014.
  • Al Shabaab fighters in Somalia publicly beheaded four men accused of spying for the country's Western-backed government, the United States and neighboring Kenya, residents in the south of the Horn of Africa country said. The al-Qaeda affiliate confirmed the executions, which took place on Sunday after the men were found guilty by an al Shabaab court in Jamame district of lower Jubba region, some 43 miles north of Kismayu.
  • U.S-led coalition planes bombed an ISIS-controlled town near the Euphrates Dam in northern Syria on Sunday, a day after the launch of a new phase of a campaign to capture the terrorists’ de-facto capital of Raqqa. Activists confirmed reports released by the terrorists’ news agency Amaq which said four raids in the last twenty four hours hit the town of Tabqa west of Raqqa, located near Syria's largest dam, at the southern end of Lake Assad on the Euphrates. A video released by Amaq showed extensive damage to a commercial center in the town but did mention any casualties.
  • Turkish police on Sunday detained some 400 suspected members of ISIS in anti-terror raids in six provinces, state media said, the biggest roundup to target the organization in Turkey. Those held were mainly foreign nationals and at least 60 suspects were detained in the capital Ankara, while 150 were arrested in Sanliurfa province near the Syrian border.
  • A member of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) who was embedded with Iraq’s Popular Mobilization Forces (PMF) was killed on Saturday by an ISIS trap near the Tal Afar airport, which is to the west of Mosul, according to Iranian media. The PMF, the umbrella organization of Iraqi-Shiite militias fighting ISIS that is dominated by IRGC-backed groups, has claimed new gains near Tal Afar during the past week. The death of Guard member Kheirollah Ahmadi underscores Iran’s involvement in Iraq.
  • A faction of the Pakistani Taliban that broke away from the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan (TTP) in 2014 has rejoined the group, and its leader has been named the deputy emir of the TTP. The reunion is the latest in a series of moves that have brought wayward Taliban groups back into the TTP’s fold to help rebuild both its capacity and strength. The “Mehsud division,” which is also known as the Movement of the Taliban in South Waziristan and the Sajna or Khalid Mehsud Group, is led by Commander Khalid Mehsud, also known as Khan Said and Sajna Mehsud.
  • The Jordanian air force conducted air strikes against ISIS targets in southern Syria on Friday night, hitting an ammunition depot, a car bomb factory and a barracks, the Jordanian military said in a statement.
  • On Friday al-Qaeda’s propaganda arm released a statement condemning the recent American counterterrorism operation in Yemen. US Central Command (CENTCOM) has confirmed that “civilian non-combatants were likely killed in the midst of a firefight during” the raid in Yemen on Jan. 29. The casualties “may include children,” CENTCOM stated, but there is no reason to believe that American forces “intentionally” sought to kill innocent women and children, as al-Qaeda alleges in their statement.