Congressman Ted Poe today sent a letter to Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters opposing the Administrations proposed rulemaking that would allow foreign investor control over United States airline companies. Earlier this year the 109th Congress, both the full House and the Senate Appropriations Committee, denounced allowing foreign interests to control all commercial aspects of a U.S. airlines operations.

Allowing the rule despite Congress overwhelming opposition is a security risk and violates the will of the people and the Congress who represents them, said Poe.

The text of the letter to Secretary Peters appears below.

The Honorable Mary E. Peters

Secretary

U.S. Department of Transportation

400 Seventh Street, S.W.

Washington, D.C. 20590-0001

Dear Secretary Peters:

Last June, a number of my House colleagues and I sent the attached letter to your predecessor, Norman Mineta, stating our profound disapproval of the Department of Transportations proposed rulemaking that would allow foreign investor control over United States airline companies. I continue to disapprove of this measure and respectfully remind you of the 109th Congress decisive bipartisan votes against this rule.

As you know, both the House and the Senate approved measures which denounce allowing foreign interests to control all commercial aspects of a U.S. airlines operations, including fleet mix, routes, frequency, classes of service and pricing. Allowing the rule despite Congress overwhelming opposition violates the will of the people and the Congress who represents them. The American public, and specifically the men and women who work in the aviation industry, have strong doubts on how changing the current law on foreign ownership might impact not only the industry, but the United States. The main concerns include:

·Jobs could be lost to other nations pilots and crew

·Airline company decisions such as routes and type of aircraft in a companys fleet would be made by entities who may not have our best interests in mind

·National security under the Civil Reserve Air Fleet program could be jeopardized or at least in question. In time of deployment U.S. airlines cooperate with the U.S. government. If a foreign company owns an American airline who is to say they will agree when it is necessary to mobilize our troops?

I believe any changes that might be made to foreign ownership laws should be accomplished only by open and vigorous Congressional scrutiny and debate rather than unilaterally imposed through rulemaking by the Executive Branch. American airline companies such as my hometown carrier, Continental Airlines, are opposed to this rulemaking authority. While it may be good for Europe, it is not good for America.

I urge you to take these arguments into consideration and withdraw the proposed rule.