• Mr. Speaker, in Iran there is no freedom of speech or press. Criticize the government of Iran and you can be arrested, tortured, and even killed. The MEK, an opposition group that only wants freedom for the Iranian people, has seen that firsthand. Hundreds of its members have been executed for doing nothing more than protesting the government.
  • It isn't just political dissidents who are persecuted in Iran. There is no freedom of religion in Iran. If you are not a Shiite Muslim, you never know when you might be dragged off to jail.
  • Just like religious minorities, women too are treated like second-class citizens and denied basic human rights. Domestic violence, that evil tactic of cowardly men, is not illegal in Iran. In October, a string of acid attacks injured women deemed ``badly veiled.'' Again, the people rose up. But these protestors were also met with tear gas, violent beatings, and arrests.
  • But there's a remarkable thing, Mr. Speaker, about repression: it cannot suppress the innate desire in all of us to be free.
  • In 2009, we saw the people of Iran fight against tyranny. Thousands of Iranians marched defiantly in the streets, protesting the fraudulent election of Ahmadinejad.
  • In response, police on motorbikes ran over protestors, fired tear gas, beat them with batons, tortured them, shot them. Over a hundred protestors were murdered in the 2 weeks that followed the election.
  • Today, President Rouhani would like us to believe that life in Iran has changed. The truth is that life in Iran has not changed. President Rouhani's words are empty lies.
  • The Iranians are freedom-loving people, and they deserve the basic human rights. Today, with this bill we tell the people of Iran that they do not fight alone. That we stand together with them against the Supreme Leader and all his cronies. And one day, hopefully soon, we will stand with them in Tehran to celebrate the downfall of the Iranian regime.
  • And that's just the way it is.