• Mr. Speaker, Cyprus has made great strides in the past decade. It turns out that, just like the United States, Cyprus has a lot of natural gas. Let's hope they don't have as much bureaucracy to get through to export their gas as we do. But the country is held back because it is still divided by a foreign power. Turkey still has 30,000 troops in Cyprus . Erdogan thinks he is still in control. The beauty of democratic elections is that you can see what the people really want.
  • And faced with the choice between a candidate that wanted to keep Cyprus divided and one that wanted to reunify Cyprus , Turkish Cypriots chose reunification .
  • It is encouraging to hear that negotiations between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots are getting back on track. You know, I was a judge in my former life. I dealt a lot with one word: justice. And as a judge I would never have allowed the kind of bullying that is seen by Turkey. The Turkish Cypriots should be able to negotiate on their own behalf. If they want peace, they should be able to get it. They don't need another foreign country like Turkey telling them what they can and cannot agree to. They do not want to be dependent on Turkey. They want to enjoy the economic freedom of the EU.
  • Reunification will require a lot of work, but ultimately it will only happen if the two sides talk to each other. This time next year I hope we can come together to celebrate the reunification of Cyprus and the end of over 40 years of Turkish occupation.
  • And that's just the way it is.